Welcome to fireflyprops.net. Click here to register

The Dark Tower movie :Roland's guns

For everything else

The Dark Tower movie :Roland's guns

Postby Fanfromthefirst » Wed Sep 20, 2017 4:33 am

I have been a fan of Stephen King's Dark Tower series for over 20 years, and so was incredibly excited to not only see the movie but also see Idris Elba as Roland Deschain.
Very recently I came across these and asked the guy if he could print me the screen accurate pair ( both cylinders swing inward, so there are "left" and "right" handed guns)
A little paint and there you have it :D


20170903_181612-756x1008.jpg
20170903_181538-756x1008.jpg

20170903_181553-756x1008.jpg
"Wanna meet the 'real' me now ?"
User avatar
Fanfromthefirst
Independent Soldier
 
Posts: 233
Joined: Fri May 16, 2014 10:03 pm
Location: Sunny Oregon

Re: The Dark Tower movie :Roland's guns

Postby AZSneed » Thu Sep 21, 2017 12:35 am

A right pretty pair, and well done work on them.
AZSneed
Browncoat
 
Posts: 2504
Joined: Thu Nov 05, 2009 2:03 am

Re: The Dark Tower movie :Roland's guns

Postby pennausamike » Thu Sep 21, 2017 2:13 am

Yup, they look really nice; especially given that they are 3-D printed!

Mike
User avatar
pennausamike
Browncoat
 
Posts: 2107
Joined: Mon May 25, 2009 1:21 am
Location: Pennsylvania, USA

Re: The Dark Tower movie :Roland's guns

Postby Fanfromthefirst » Thu Sep 21, 2017 2:42 am

Thanks guys :D The shop also supplied 6 rounds per gun which are in each cylinder.
I should've taken a pic with the cylinders out, next time :)
The screen used metal and stunt rubber guns were/ are on eBay but at from $1500+ for the rubber
and 8 grand for the metal they are way out of my price range.
The above set was a much more reasonable $85 !
"Wanna meet the 'real' me now ?"
User avatar
Fanfromthefirst
Independent Soldier
 
Posts: 233
Joined: Fri May 16, 2014 10:03 pm
Location: Sunny Oregon

Re: The Dark Tower movie :Roland's guns

Postby taimdala » Thu Sep 21, 2017 8:19 pm

Wow. Did the fabricator sand down the guns before painting them? They look so very smooth! ^_^

And do you think that studios will use 3D printing for props more frequently? Will 3D printing become the only method for props fabrication?

I hope not. While I use Photoshop darned near every day, I haven't given up "analog" arts/crafts supplies. I know where my X-acto knife is and, much like my favorite bathtowel, it hadn't outlived its usefulness yet.
"Never, never, never give in ... except to convictions of honor and good sense."
User avatar
taimdala
Browncoat
 
Posts: 2275
Joined: Thu Nov 03, 2011 6:10 pm

Re: The Dark Tower movie :Roland's guns

Postby taimdala » Thu Sep 21, 2017 8:21 pm

On a related theme--(and perhaps it's worthy of a thread on its own)--does anyone think that 3D printing is a method for propsmaking that's here to stay? I don't want to suggest it's a superior method, but I can see how it might come to dominate the field.

What do y'all think about this? Are we approaching real-life Star Trek replicators? Should we go there? Or keep the "old school" skills alive and well?
"Never, never, never give in ... except to convictions of honor and good sense."
User avatar
taimdala
Browncoat
 
Posts: 2275
Joined: Thu Nov 03, 2011 6:10 pm

Re: The Dark Tower movie :Roland's guns

Postby Fanfromthefirst » Thu Sep 21, 2017 8:54 pm

taimdala wrote:Wow. Did the fabricator sand down the guns before painting them? They look so very smooth! ^_^



No, the fabricator did not sand the guns, it was a very good print with just a few very minor blemishes that I had to clean
up. I painted them myself. The print was in a metallic silver
which meant there wasn't alot that needed done to the metal
parts, just a thin black wash and painting the trigger guard brass. The grips, on the other hand have 6 six layers of paint and a satin spray top coat. :D
"Wanna meet the 'real' me now ?"
User avatar
Fanfromthefirst
Independent Soldier
 
Posts: 233
Joined: Fri May 16, 2014 10:03 pm
Location: Sunny Oregon

Re: The Dark Tower movie :Roland's guns

Postby Fanfromthefirst » Thu Sep 21, 2017 9:01 pm

taimdala wrote:On a related theme--(and perhaps it's worthy of a thread on its own)--does anyone think that 3D printing is a method for propsmaking that's here to stay? I don't want to suggest it's a superior method, but I can see how it might come to dominate the field.

What do y'all think about this? Are we approaching real-life Star Trek replicators? Should we go there? Or keep the "old school" skills alive and well?


3d printing certainly has it place in prop making for sure, but
I don't think it will replace true craftsmanship anytime soon.
Speaking personally, there is something quite magical in taking a piece of wood, plastic, metal or whatever and making it into another object entirely. Making things from scratch is half the fun :D
"Wanna meet the 'real' me now ?"
User avatar
Fanfromthefirst
Independent Soldier
 
Posts: 233
Joined: Fri May 16, 2014 10:03 pm
Location: Sunny Oregon

Re: The Dark Tower movie :Roland's guns

Postby taimdala » Thu Sep 21, 2017 10:11 pm

Fanfromthefirst wrote:Making things from scratch is half the fun :D


More than half!

There's nothing that can replace the pleasure of actually handling the materials and the tools when making something. As much as I like Photoshop for the graphics manipulations, I still have my paper, pencils, pens, markers, and paints. Not giving those up anytime soon.

Besides, there is a significant shift in the digital graphics arena toward "imperfection" tools. Witness all the digital resources that replicate the handcrafted edges of the analog mediums (like rough and messy brushes for Illustrator), as well as registration errors from the offset printing processes. Such manufactured imperfection is called "retro" and "grunge" and is apparently in high demand.

I think the world has become so buried in digital perfection that analog outcomes have become new and exciting again. What would have disqualified an analog product from production in the analog-only days are now a hot marketing strategy. If you look, you can see it everywhere.

I have mixed feelings about it all. If I have to see one more Instagram filter that imposes artificial light leaks or overexposure or color emulsion fade, I'll gorram scream!

On the other hand, I rather love the scratched/folded/worn-paper-product textures people add to an otherwise perfect photo, giving it a found-artifact/old-attic-treasure feel.

I guess it's all a matter of appropriate application, much like choosing a font that suits the project. It's a knack of discernment few people possess, or having it in possession, one that is nevertheless infrequently exercised.

I wonder if 3D printing will undergo a similar progression?
"Never, never, never give in ... except to convictions of honor and good sense."
User avatar
taimdala
Browncoat
 
Posts: 2275
Joined: Thu Nov 03, 2011 6:10 pm

Re: The Dark Tower movie :Roland's guns

Postby Joatrash » Fri Sep 22, 2017 1:42 am

Fanfromthefirst wrote:Making things from scratch is half the fun :D

taimdala wrote:There's nothing that can replace the pleasure of actually handling the materials and the tools when making something.


As someone who has done everything from analog to digital, what gives me pleasure is knowing that by using a wide range of methods and tools without discrimination or limit , I can make just about anything in my little 4X2 meter walk-in-closet workshop and I can be almost completely independent in doing so. (I also have to admit to being very happy about not having to wear dust-masks all the time and subjecting myself less to chemicals like casting resins and the like.)

Computers and 3d printers are tools, nothing else. No less valid than saws, files and sandpaper. The best tool for the job is what should be used. Some items crave digital tools to even be possible and others are simply easier to do with analog methods.

Take VERA. The original was of course machined, and has a staggering number of complex engineered parts. Before 3d printing, replicating it with anything approaching accuracy without access to a CNC (or at least an industrial-grade mill and lathe workshop) was for all intents and purposes impossible in practical terms.

The 3d printer make take your work from the virtual world to the physical, but unless you're just downloading stuff from the internet or paying someone to do the modeling, you've still done the work- just maybe in a different order. I can honestly say that since moving to mainly 3d printing props, I work harder and longer because the tools let me add features and functions that would be nigh-on impossible using purely analog methods.

Sometimes, using digital tools is regarded as "cheating". In those cases, I ask where the line is drawn. What is cheating? Using metal files? A hacksaw? Power tools? CNC?

Other times, people make the (false) argument that the computer "does all the work" and makes everything too perfect, taking all the skill out of it. If that were the case, why are there thousands of horrendously inaccurate and ugly 3d printed props floating around? (Or crappy CGI in movies for that matter.)

If you need to cut out a groove out of an object, you need to work out how to do it, where you want it, how deep, long etc. Then you manipulate whatever tool you need to make the change in your chosen medium, whether that is resin, clay or numerical coordinates on a screen.

Here's an example where several methods were combined to do something that would otherwise be difficult or impossible:
I'm currently modeling a kit of Orson Krennic's blaster from Star Wars Rogue One. The final version will be mostly 3d printed (with functional parts such as barrel break, trigger and so on) but I want to at least use metal tubing for the barrel and scope. Unfortunately, the barrel needs to be machined in one spot to allow a swivel hinge for the barrel break, but I don't have a mill, nor access to one and cutting out the area by hand would be too imprecise. What I did instead was model up a jig that allowed me to use a regular power drill as a mill. The jig has a printed shell with an inserted brass tube that locks and guides the drill bit, keeping everything steady while it grinds away at the metal. Other times, I've made jigs that have allowed me to use my little Proxxon table saw to cut panel lines in aluminum, or tools that have allowed me to exactly split superfine styrene rods down the middle. The 3d printer tool has allowed me to use creative ingenuity to make analogs tool to solve problems that would have been impossible for me to do otherwise, not because of a lack of skill, but because I don't have access to certain equipment.

Whether working by analog or digital methods, you're using the two most important tools you have at your disposal: your brain to work out what to do and your hands to steer the tools to do it.

And to the O.P. : congrats on the guns! I thought the movie was pretty good, with stellar acting from the leads, but should have been made into a series instead.
//jOe

My prop & costume workshop/gallery:
https://www.facebook.com/joatrashfx/
User avatar
Joatrash
Browncoat
 
Posts: 726
Joined: Fri Jun 05, 2009 8:22 pm

Next

Return to Off-Topic

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron